Reform movements 1800s sought expand democratic ideals ap

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Reform movements 1800s sought expand democratic ideals ap

Maori-only positions on government agencies Maori-only consultation rights under the Resource Management Act Maori-only co-management of parks, rivers, lakes, and the coastline Maori-only ownership rights to the foreshore and seabed A special Maori Authority tax rate of But they Reform movements 1800s sought expand democratic ideals ap remember that the statistics on these matters are no longer clear-cut.

History Section

Back in the seventies, when widespread intermarriage was resulting in a sharp decline in the number of people who could be categorised as Maori, the Labour Government changed the rules.

This guaranteed that the number of people being classified as Maori would continue to grow, since anyone with even a smidgeon of Maori blood could, for official purposes, be counted as Maori. InSimon Chapple, a senior researcher with the Department of Labour, used census data to examine the impact of these new definitions.

He found that instead of theNew Zealanders who indicated they were Maori-only being recognised as Maori for statistical purposes, the new policy of adding everyone who included Maori as one of their ethnic groups into the final count, boosted the official tally toSimon Chapple recommended to the Government that the Maori ethnic group should be restricted to those who identify as Maori-only in the Census, with everyone else allocated to their other major ethnic group.

But his suggestion was ignored. As a result, so-called Maori disadvantage is overstated. In addition, a fact that Mr Davis and others like to conveniently forget, is that while people who claim Maori ancestry might appear to be over represented in our worst social statistics, the causes are well documented and include long-term welfare dependency, solo parenthood, child abuse, and educational failure.

TVNZ denied the accusations of racism being made against it. But Mr Davis, no doubt with his own self-interest in mind, remained adamant: People ask questions all the time about potentially controversial things, we live in an open society and people are free to ask a question.

In this country — at least at the present time — our rights to free speech are protected by law and guaranteed under Clause 14 of the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act: The right to offend is at the heart of robust debate about controversial matters.

Reform movements 1800s sought expand democratic ideals ap

As British comedian Rowan Atkinson explained ; "The freedom to criticise or ridicule ideas — even if they are sincerely held beliefs — is a fundamental freedom of society.

In my view the right to offend is far more important than any right not to be offended. The right to ridicule is far more important to society than any right not to be ridiculed because one in my view represents openness — and the other represents oppression. This process is at least as remarkable as anything that happened in the seventeenth century.

It is complete nonsense to describe the current misinterpretation of the Treaty as anything remotely like Magna Carta. Feigning offence is a tactic commonly used by those who want to close down a debate. By using this strategy and playing the race card, Kelvin Davis was able to divert attention away from the real issue of Maori privilege onto the question of whether or not KiwiMeter — and TVNZ — is racist.

By using bully-boy tactics, they no doubt hope to intimidate newspapers and discourage them from running such ads in the future. And with the Human Rights Commission maintaining a register of media that publish material they deem to be unfavourable to Maori, it is clear that our fundamental right to the freedom of speech is under serious threat.

If, as a society, we value free speech, we must not allow ourselves to be intimidated into silence. For silence is interpreted as approval. In the present debate over fresh water, the government will think that those who are not speaking out condone tribal control — when that is the very thing that most will oppose.

Speaking up is vital in a democracy. Your single voice is critical. Together many voices can move a nation. People power is the only way to stop this — a simple email stating your position and sent to watersubmissions mfe.

And why not send your thoughts on to all National MPs their addresses are hereas they are the only ones who can stop this. This exposes the same plan that is being rolled out globally, not just in the United States.

We are not a free society. Media will tell us that we are free, but we are not free. We are slaves, our slave chains are made of paper - and that paper is the Federal Reserve note [including the central bankster issued debt-based-notes of every other country].

But if all of the people of the world stood up at the same time and said "No more private central banks", it will come crashing down, just as slavery did, just as rule by divine right did and we will be embarking on a new era in human history where the emphasis on human development is on the people and not on the money junkies.

Reform movements 1800s sought expand democratic ideals ap

This does not mean we should not remember the dead, who were duped into giving their lives for lies. The Bankers own the Earth. Take it away from them, but leave them the power to create deposits, and with the flick of a pen they will create enough deposits to buy it back again.

However, take it away from them, and all the fortunes like mine will disappear, and they ought to disappear, for this world would be a happier and better world to live in. But if you wish to remain slaves of the Bankers and pay for the cost of your own slavery, let them continue to create deposits.The Hollywood Reporter is your source for breaking news about Hollywood and entertainment, including movies, TV, reviews and industry blogs.

International Law. Christopher C. Joyner. International law is the body of customs, principles, and rules recognized as effectively binding legal obligations by sovereign states and other international actors. "The inherent vice of capitalism is the unequal sharing of the blessings.

The inherent blessing of socialism is the equal sharing of misery. " - Winston Churchill. The term you are looking for is ‘biologians’. As for the article 悪くない. However, the right to say whatever we like is tempered by the Human Rights Act, which makes it an offence to express opinions that could be deemed to be ‘threatening, abusive, or insulting’ on the grounds of ‘colour, race, or ethnic or national origins’.

After being taken down twice by Blogger within a single week, we got the message: It’s Time To Go. Gates of Vienna has moved to a new address.

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